New ARRL Radio Lab Will Inspire Your Ham Shack!

Posted courtesy of ARRL [http://www.arrl.org/news/new-arrl-radio-lab-inspires-innovation-in-the-ham-shack ]

Introducing the brand new ARRL Radio Laboratory, W1HQ! Join Jherica Goodgame, KI5HTA, as she walks you through everything there is to know about this newest edition to ARRL Headquarters.

The ARRL Radio Lab is an innovative test space designed to reshape the way we imagine and build a ham radio shack. From a decluttered workspace and a digital user interface to be able to remote into the station from anywhere, W1HQ is a step toward the future of amateur radio. Produced by Alex Norstrom, KC1RMO

Antennas being used for W1HQ:

JK Antennas XR5-JK, Multiband Yagi for 10, 12, 15, 17 & 20 meters

Cushcraft A50-5S, 6-meter Yagi Verticals

•Guy wires: Phillystran 2 meters, 70 centimeters, 23 centimeters

•Rotator: M2 Antenna Systems OR2800 Series Azimuth Rotator

Tower:

•Rohn 55G Series Guyed Tower, 40-feet

Equipment being used inside of W1HQ:

Elecraft K4 Transceiver FlexRadio

Flex-6400 Signature Series SDR Transceiver

FlexRadio Power Genius XL amplifier

Icom IC-9700 HF/VHF/UHF Transceiver

•Green Heron Engineering LLC Rotator Controller, RT-21

•Green Heron Engineering LLC Rotator Controller Az/El, RT-21azel

•Raspberry Pi 400 Personal Computer Kit

Congratulations to Audrey McElroy, KM4BUN – AR Newsline Young Ham of the Year!

 From Amateur Radio Newsline – 

 

“Really? Oh, my God!”

That was the reaction of Audrey McElroy KM4BUN after learning she had been selected as the recipient of Newsline’s Young Ham of the Year award.

Audrey, of Cumming, Georgia, is the daughter of Thomas McElroy, W4SDR, and Janet McElroy, K4PRM. Her brother, Jack, is KM4ZIA.

Audrey is 18 and an honor student who graduated in June from Forsyth Central High School in Cumming, Georgia. She already has begun computer science studies at Georgia Tech.

She credits her parents with generating her early interest in amateur radio.

“By the age of like 3 or 4, I was out there helping my dad put antennas up, run coax in the hot summer heat,” she recalls. “And, I became so fascinated looking into the radios.”

Audrey passed her Tech test in June 2014 at the age of 10, took her General license exam a few years later, and passed her Extra test on Election Night 2016 at the age of 13.

In 2019, Audrey was invited to join the Dave Kalter Memorial Youth DX Adventure to Curacao.

“Probably one of the best experiences in my life, not only in amateur radio but overall,” she recalls. “We were so blessed to be able to use the PJ2T station.

“And we spent day and night making contacts. We broke the record for the number of contacts made. I think we made over 65-hundred contacts in just the span of really just a few days when you count up all the hours.”

Audrey says she put her love of amateur radio together with her pursuit of biotechnology STEM studies in high school to produce a senior capstone project that involved a high-altitude balloon launch.

Her payload was small roundworms or C elegans.

“My whole project was launching them up to 100,000 feet, which I calculated using the amount of helium and everything,” she explains. “And at the same time, I was taking measurements and readings about the pressure and the temperature.”

But this was not her first launch. She credits her mentor, Bill Brown, WB8ELK, a NASA engineer, with helping her achieve success in launching several high-altitude and orbiting balloons including one that circled the globe nearly five times.

Audrey has made presentations during forums in Dayton, Huntsville, and for the Youth on the Air camp. Audrey says promoting amateur radio is a big part of her immediate future.

“Now I kind of make it my mission to bring more youth and especially women into amateur radio and STEM,” she says.

Audrey will receive her award on Saturday, Aug. 20 during ceremonies at the Huntsville Hamfest in the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

 

Congratulations and Best Wishes Audrey!

Field Day 2022 is almost here!

Field Day 2022 is almost here!

CLICK HERE for all the latest information about SVARC’s Field Day operations at the Clarke County Fairgrounds this weekend, June 25-26. Help us spread the word. Invite local government representatives and influencers. Especially invite anyone interested in learning more about Amateur Radio. We’ll have an educational display and literature available. Tell your social media friends and use hashtags #ARRLFD and #SVARCFD.

This year, we’ll be operating 3A and have purchased new laptops and a new antenna to ensure everyone’s operating experience is better than ever. We need operators to make contacts from 2pm Saturday to 1:59pm Sunday. Even if you can only come for a little while, please join us and help us earn more points.

There are some changes this year. Our Field Day Page has all the details. Here are some pictures from past SVARC Field Days:

Field Day
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Special Event Station K4S: Operating 90 Feet Down

Special Event Station K4S: Operating 90 Feet Down

The Woodstock Amateur Radio Group, spearheaded by Carl Dennis NX3A and supported by several SVARC members from Shenandoah County, operated Special Event Station K4S from inside Shenandoah Caverns in Quicksburg, VA, on Saturday, May 21 and Sunday, May 22, from 9AM to 5PM each day. The event was to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Shenandoah Caverns.

The station was set up 90 feet underground at the foot of the stairs where tour groups descended from the main building. Setup was a big undertaking, with 260 feet of coax from the off-center-fed 80-meter dipole down to the station’s ICOM 7300.

In spite of the high noise level, well over 250 contacts were made to stations throughout the United States as far west as California as well as in Canada and Puerto Rico. We later learned that many stations heard us and tried to call, but we couldn’t pull them out of the noise. Certificates were available for those contacting K4S during the event in exchange for a QSL card and an 8.5 X 11 SASE.

We got lots of looks and a few questions from tourists passing by. Literature about Amateur Radio was offered to those interested. Joe Proctor of Shenandoah Caverns was extremely enthusiastic about the special event station being a part of their anniversary events planned throughout the day that culminated in an impressive fireworks display Saturday evening.

Thanks to everyone who participated in this unique event.

Shenandoah Caverns On-the-Air, Spring 2022
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Annual Armed Forces Day Cross-Band Exercise Set for May 14

Reposted from ARRL.org 

The US Department of Defense will host this year’s Armed Forces Day (AFD) Cross-Band Test on Saturday, May 14. While Armed Forces Day is May 21, the AFD cross-band military-amateur radio event traditionally takes place 1 week earlier to avoid any conflict with the Dayton Hamvention®. The event is open to all radio amateurs.

The AFD Cross-Band Test is two-way communications exercise between military and amateur radio stations, as authorized under FCC Part 97 rules (47 CFR § 97.111), and Department of Defense Instruction 4650.02 which establishes the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS). During the exercise, radio amateurs listen for stations on military operating frequencies and transmit on frequencies in adjacent amateur bands.

ARRL  The National Association for Amateur Radio® has promoted the participation of military and amateur radio stations in the AFD event for more than 50 years. In the August 1950 issue of ARRL’s membership journal, QST, it was noted that “232 persons made perfect copy of the ‘Greeting to Amateurs’ broadcast at 25 w.p.m. over 13 military frequencies and have received a Certificate of Merit signed by the Secretary of Defense, the Honorable Louis Johnson.”

There are 24 military stations registered across the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii, that will be participating in the 2022 event. Several of those stations will be using the 60-meter interoperative channels during this exercise. All operations will be on a not-to-interfere basis, in case there are real-world missions being supported during the event timeframe.

An AFD Secretary of Defense message will also be sent in CW and RTTY, and an AFD message will also be transmitted utilizing the Military Standard (MIL-STD) serial PSK waveform (M110), followed by MIL-STD Wide Shift FSK (850 Hz RTTY), as described in MIL-STD 188-110A/B.

A detailed list of modes and frequencies for military/government stations taking part in the Armed Forces Day Cross-Band Test and information on the AFD message is available at www.dodmars.org. In the upper right corner is a dropdown with all the information.

Complete the request form to obtain a QSL card at www.usarmymars.org/armed-forces-day-qsl-card-request.

From DODMars.org PDF Version of the information below.

Frequencies: 

ANNUAL ARMED FORCES DAY CROSSBAND TEST (14 May 2022)

The Department of Defense will host this year’s Armed Forces Day (AFD) Crossband Test, scheduled for May 14, 2022. This annual event is open to all licensed amateur radio operators and will not impact any public or private communications. For more than 50 years, military and amateur stations have taken part in this event, which is an interoperability exercise between hobbyist and government radio stations.

The AFD Crossband Test is a unique opportunity to test two-way communications between military communicators and radio stations in the Amateur Radio Service (ARS), as authorized in 47 CFR 97.111. These tests provide opportunities and challenges for radio operators to demonstrate individual technical skills in a tightly controlled exercise scenario that does not impact any public or private communications. Military stations will transmit on selected military frequencies and will announce the specific ARS frequencies monitored. All times are ZULU (Z), and all frequencies are Upper Side Band (USB) unless otherwise noted. The frequencies used for the test will not impact any public or private communications and will not stray outside the
confines of the exercise.

The following stations will be making two-way radiotelephone contacts with stations in the ARS between the time periods listed on the frequencies listed in Kilohertz below.

AAZ / FT HUACHUCA, AZ
1500Z – 2359Z 5,330.5 kHz USB 14,579.0 kHz USB 18,211.0 kHz USB

AAC / BARROW ARMY RESERVE CENTER, KY (USB + RTTY)
1100Z – 2259Z 5,346.5 kHz USB 6,968.5 kHz USB 13,963.5 kHz USB

AAN / U.S. NORTHERN COMMAND, CO
1300Z – 1800Z 5,357.0 kHz USB 6,970.5 kHz USB 14,550.5 kHz USB

AAU / HQ US ARMY GARRISON FORT KNOX, KY (USB + RTTY)
1400Z – 1800Z 5,346.5 kHz US 7,493.5 kHz USB 14,441.5 kHz USB 18,281.5 kHz USB

ABH / SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, HI
1900Z – 0200Z 14,512.5 kHz USB 18,254.0 kHz USB 20,997.0 kHz USB

ADB / CAMP FOSTER, OKINAWA
1500Z – 2400Z 14,487.0 kHz USB 20,994.0 kHz USB

AGA0WJ / NAS WHIDBEY ISLAND, WA
1500Z – 2400Z 5,346.5 kHz USB 6,897.5 kHz USB 13,538.5 kHz USB

AFM4NPD / NAVAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY MID-SOUTH, MILLINGTON, TN
1200Z – 2000Z 4,575.0 kHz USB 7,540.0 kHz USB 15,807.0 kHz USB 20,740.0 kHz UBS

AAM3D / DISA CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS DIRECTORATE, FT MEADE, MD
1300Z – 2000Z 5,403.5 kHz USB 13,509.0 kHz USB 18,272.5 kHz USB

WAR / PENTAGON WASHINGTON, DC (USB + CW + RTTY)
1200Z – 2400Z 5,357.0 kHz USB 7,357.0 kHz USB 13,910.5 kHz USB 20,920.0 kHz USB

AIR / ANDREWS AFB
1200Z – 2359Z 4,517.0 kHz USB 7,305.0 kHz USB 15,807.0 kHz USB 20,740.0 kHz USB

AGA2SY / HANCOCK FIELD, NY
1200Z – 2359Z 4,575.0 kHz USB 7,540.0 kHz USB 13,993.0 kHz USB

AGA5SC / SCOTT AFB, IL
1600Z – 2300Z 7,305.0 kHz U 7,915.0 kHz USB 14,832.0 kHz USB 27,736.0 kHz USB

AGA5TR / TRAVIS AFB, CA
1600Z – 2359MARSZ 4,017.0 kHz USB 7,329.0 kHz USB 13,996.0 kHz USB 14,411.0 kHz USB

MARSRADIO /
1400Z –0100Z 4,557.0 kHz USB 7,460.0 kHz USB 14,606.0 kHz USB

MARSCOMM /
1400Z – 0100Z 4,448.5 kHz USB 6,994.5.0 kHz USB 14,877.0 kHz USB

NWKJ / USS YORKTOWN PATRIOTS POINT, SC
1300Z – 2200Z 4,027.0 kHz USB 7,360.0 kHz USB 14,438.5 kHz USB

NEPM / USS IOWA BB 61 LOS ANGELES, CA (USB + CW)
1400Z – 2359Z 4,018.0 kHz USB 5,371.5 kHz USB 7,360.0 kHz USB 13,506.5 kHz USB
18,639 kHz USB 20,518.5 kHz USB

NIIW / USS MIDWAY CV-41 SAN DIEGO, CA (USB + CW + RTTY)
0000Z – 0600Z & 1401Z -2359Z 4,003.5 kHz USB 5,403.5 kHz USB 7,357.0 kHz USB
14,383.5 kHz USB 18,293.0 kHz USB

NWVC / LST-325 EVANSVILLE, IN (USB + CW)
1200Z – 0300Z 3,325.0 kHz USB 6,913.0 kHz USB 9,988.5 kHz USB 13,974.0 kHz USB

NSS / US NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MD (USB + CW)
1300Z – 0200Z 4,038.5 kHz USB 5,330.5 kHz USB 7,533.5 kHz USB 9,947.0 kHz USB 14,487.0 kHz USB

NAF / NEWPORT NAVAL RADIO STATION MUSEUM NEWPORT, RI (USB + CW)
1300Z – 2300Z 7,498.5 kHz USB 14,463.5 kHz USB

NMC1/ US COAST GUARD BASE ALAMEDA, CA
1700Z – 2359Z 7,351.5 kHz USB 14,459.5 kHz USB

SCHOOLHOUSE/ SAVANNAH CYBER TRAINING CENTER SAVANNAH, GA
1200Z – 1900Z 5,371.5 kHz USB 7,431.5 kHz USB 13,528.5 kHz USB

An AFD message will be transmitted utilizing the Military Standard (MIL-STD) Serial PSK waveform

(M110) followed by MIL-STD Wide Shift FSK (850 Hz RTTY) as described in MIL-STD 188-110A/B.

Technical information regarding these waveforms is provided at:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1pYDj7kQbm-QAyY4RPtx0dOXKohjaEjq9?usp=sharing

The AFD Sec Def Message will also be sent in Continuous Wave (CW) mode and Radio Teletype (RRTY) at 1400Z and 2000Z on the frequency designated below.

AAZ: MILSTD110 14,579.0 kHz USB
AAU: MILSTD110 14,441.5 kHz USB
AAC: MILSTD110/RTTY 13,963.5 kHz USB
AGA0WJ: MILSTD110 13,538.5 kHz USB
ADB: MILSTD110 20,994.0 kHz USB
WAR: MILSTD110/RTTY/CW 13,910.5 kHz USB
AAM3D: MILSTD110 13,509.0 kHz USB
NEPM: RTTY 13,506.5 kHz USB
NWVC: CW 13,974.0 kHz USB
NIIW: MILSTD110/RTTY/CW 14,383.5 kHz USB

For those who wish to document their contacts with a QSL card, go to https://www.usarmymars.org/events and
complete the request form.

FCC $35 Amateur Application Fee Effective Date will be April 19

 

The FCC released a Public Notice<https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-22-307A1.pdf> on March 23, 2022, stating that the amateur radio application fees, including those associated with Form 605 application filings, would become effective on April 19, 2022. The Federal Communications Commission’s authority to impose and collect fees is mandated by Congress.

The $35 application fee, when it becomes effective on April 19, will apply to new, modification (upgrade and sequential call sign change), renewal, and vanity call sign applications. The fee will be per application.

Administrative updates, such as a change of name, mailing or email address, will be exempt from fees.

VECs and Volunteer Examiner (VE) teams will not have to collect the $35 fee at exam sessions.
Once the FCC application fee takes effect, new and upgrade applicants will pay the $15 exam session fee to the ARRL VE team as usual and pay the $35 application fee directly to the FCC by using the CORES FRN Registration system (CORES – Login<https://apps.fcc.gov/cores/userLogin.do>). VEC and VE team licensing procedures will not change.

When the FCC receives the examination information from the VEC, it will email a link with payment instructions to each successful candidate. The candidate will have 10 calendar days, from the date of the application file number being issued, to pay. After the fee is paid, and the FCC has processed an application, examinees will receive a second email from the FCC with a link to their official license. The link will be good for 30 days.

Per usual procedures, examinees that pass multiple exams at one session, will have one application transmitted to the FCC reflecting the highest level license class earned. Again, our procedures will not change. The candidates will have an extra step before the license is issued. VE teams can point candidates to our FCC Application Fee webpage www.arrl.org/fcc-application-fee<http://www.arrl.org/fcc-application-fee>. Our new ARRL VEC CSCEs also include information about the application fee and points candidates to the webpage.

For VE teams holding exam sessions the weekend before April 19, the FCC stated if these applications are not submitted to the FCC before April 19, they will be subjected to the fee if received on or after April 19.

 

Additionally, the FCC stated that applications processed and dismissed will not be entitled to a refund. This includes vanity requests where the applicant does not receive the requested call sign. However, returned applications that are missing information will not require an additional fee, if the missing information is given to the FCC within the proper amount of time.

Youth Licensing Grant Program
Anticipating the implementation of the fee in 2022, the ARRL Board of Directors, at its July 2021 meeting, approved the “ARRL Youth Licensing Grant Program<https://www.arrl.org/news/arrl-board-establishes-program-to-cover-initial-fcc-license-fee-for-young-applicants>.” Under the program, ARRL will cover a one-time $35 application fee for license candidates younger than 18 years old for tests administered under the auspices of the ARRL Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (ARRL VEC). Qualified candidates also would pay a reduced exam session fee of $5 to the ARRL VEC. ARRL is finalizing details for administering the program.

Further news and instructions will follow as the FCC releases them. Details for the ARRL Youth Licensing Grant Program will be similarly posted, when available.

ARRL VEC Application Fees webpage: http://www.arrl.org/fcc-application-fee (ARRL website is getting a new look and will be unavailable from Friday March 25, 2022 until Tuesday March 29, 2022)

ARRL News Story: http://www.arrl.org/news/new-amateur-radio-license-applications-fee-to-become-effective-april-19-2022 (ARRL website is getting a new look and will be unavailable from Friday March 25, 2022 until Tuesday March 29, 2022)

FCC CORES Video Tutorials: https://www.fcc.gov/licensing-databases/fcc-registration-system-cores/commission-registration-system-video-tutorials

FCC Registration Help: https://apps.fcc.gov/cores/publicHome.do?help=true